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Attorney General rejects proposed Ohio marijuana amendment – 21 ouch

Ouch

COLUMBUS, Ohio –
Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine has rejected the petition for a proposed amendment to the Ohio Constitution which would attempt to legalize marijuana use in the state.On February 13th, the Ohio Attorney General’s Office received a written petition to amend the Ohio Constitution, entitled “Medical Marijuana and Personal Use Amendment,” from the group Responsible Ohio. 1,000 valid signatures from registered Ohio voters were submitted.Attorney General DeWine found at least two defects with the summary language.  DeWine says that the summary language omits that the proposed amendment permits the sharing of specified amounts of marijuana between adults 21 years old and older.

The attorney general also said that the language does not accurately reflect the manner in which proposed taxes would be distributed.

DeWine also noted that at least one marijuana establishment proposed in the amendment may be within 1,000 feet of a “house of worship and/or a public playground,” which would also conflict with claims made in the summary language. However, due to the other deficiencies with the summary petition, the Attorney General’s Office did not attempt to validate the claims regarding locations.

“After reviewing the submission, I conclude that I am unable to certify the summary as a fair and truthful statement of the proposed amendment,” DeWine stated in a letter to the petitioners.

The full text of the letter and of the amendment petitions submitted can be found at www.OhioAttorneyGeneral.gov/BallotInitiatives.

Attorney General rejects proposed Ohio marijuana amendment – 21 News Now, More Local News for Youngstown, Ohio –.

Congressional Legislation Introduced to Get the Federal Government Out of the Marijuana Enforcement Business | NORML Blog, Marijuana Law Reform

by Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director
February 23, 2015Get the Federal Government Out of the Marijuana Enforcement BusinessLegislation was introduced Friday in the US House of Representatives to permit states to establish their own marijuana regulatory policies free from federal interference.

House Resolution 1013, the Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol Act, removes cannabis from the United States Controlled Substances Act. It also removes enforcement power from the US Drug Enforcement Administration in matters concerning marijuana possession, production, and sales — thus permitting state governments to regulate these activities as they see fit.

Said the bill’s primary sponsor, Democrat Jared Polis of Colorado: “Over the past year, Colorado has demonstrated that regulating marijuana like alcohol takes money away from criminals and cartels, grows our economy, and keeps marijuana out of the hands of children. While President Obama and the Justice Department have allowed the will of voters in states like Colorado and 22 other jurisdictions to move forward, small business owners, medical  marijuana patients, and others who follow state laws still live with the fear that a new administration – or this one—could reverse course and turn them into criminals. It is time for us to replace the failed prohibition with a regulatory system that works and let states and municipalities decide for themselves if they want, or don’t want, to have legal marijuana within their borders.”

Separate legislation, House Resolution 1014: the Marijuana Tax Revenue Act, introduced by Democrat Rep. Earl Blumenauer of Oregon, seeks to impose a federal excise tax on the retail sale of marijuana for non-medical purposes as well as apply an occupational tax for state-licensed marijuana businesses. Such commercial taxes would only be applicable if and when Congress has moved to defederalize marijuana prohibition.

“It’s time for the federal government to chart a new path forward for marijuana.” said Rep. Blumenauer. “Together these bills create a federal framework to legalize, regulate and tax marijuana, much like we treat alcohol and tobacco. The federal prohibition of marijuana has been a failure, wasting tax dollars and ruining countless lives. As more states move to legalize marijuana as Oregon, Colorado, Washington and Alaska have done, it’s imperative the federal government become a full partner in building a workable and safe framework.”

Similar versions of these measures were introduced in the previous Congress but failed to gain federal hearings.

To contact your US House member and urge him/her to support House Resolution 1013, the Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol Act and/or other pending federal marijuana law reform legislation, please visit NORML’s Take Action page here.

Congressional Legislation Introduced to Get the Federal Government Out of the Marijuana Enforcement Business | NORML Blog, Marijuana Law Reform.