LeBOWLski Fest

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On March 6th in 1998 one of the greatest cult movies ever was released! Pittsburgh Norml and the Pittsburgh Norml Women’s Alliance are happy to bring you #LeBOWLskiFest celebrating The Big Lebowski!

Sunday March 8th from 5PM – MIDNIGHT at Hollywood Lanes in Dormont, Pennsylvania.

$20 donation gets you:
-Admission to the event and 10 raffle tickets
-2 hours worth of bowling including shoe rental
-Open bar

There will also be prizes for best costumes, raffle items abd more. Come in costume and get a free Clique Vodka “The Dude” (aka White Russian)

This event is 21+

Proceeds benefit #PittsburghNORML

We are seeking a band to perform at this event too. If you know someone who would fit the bill please have them message us.

Nihilists are also welcome!

Yes Felons can Vote

Yes Felons can Vote

An estimated 5.26 million people (as of 2004) with a felony conviction are barred from voting in elections – a condition known as disenfranchisement. Each state has its own laws on disenfranchisement. While Vermont and Maine allow felons to vote while in prison, nine other states permanently restrict certain felons from voting.

Proponents of felon re-enfranchisement say that felons who have paid their debt to society by completing their sentences should have all of their rights and privileges restored. They argue that efforts to block ex-felons from voting are unfair, undemocratic, and politically or racially motivated.

Opponents say felon voting restrictions are consistent with other voting limitations such as age, residency, sanity, etc., and other felon restrictions such as no guns for violent offenders and no sex offenders near schools. They say that convicted felons have demonstrated poor judgment and should not be trusted with a vote.

An estimated 5.26 million people (as of 2004) with a felony conviction are barred from voting in elections – a condition known as disenfranchisement. Each state has its own laws on disenfranchisement. While Vermont and Maine allow felons to vote while in prison, nine other states permanently restrict certain felons from voting. Proponents of felon re-enfranchisement say that felons who have paid their debt to society by completing their sentences should have all of their rights and privileges restored. They argue that efforts to block ex-felons from voting are unfair, undemocratic, and politically or racially motivated. Opponents say felon voting restrictions are consistent with other voting limitations such as age, residency, sanity, etc., and other felon restrictions such as no guns for violent offenders and no sex offenders near schools. They say that convicted felons have demonstrated poor judgment and should not be trusted with a vote.

http://felonvoting.procon.org/sourcefiles/Pennsylvania_Voting_Rule.pdf

The Commonwealth Court of Pennsylvania ruled on December 26, 2000 that the Pennsylvania law prohibiting convicted felons from registering to vote for five years after their release from prison is unconstitutional. Consequently, if completing an older version of the Voter Registration MailApplication (VRMA) form, a convicted felon who has been released from prison may make applicationto register to vote by striking through the felony conviction line at Section 9(2) on the VRMA and signing his or her name.

l Convicted felons who are incarcerated on the date of a primary or general election are not eligible to vote, regardless of whether they are registered. However, pre-trial detainees and misdemeanants are eligible to register to vote and/or to vote by absentee ballot if they otherwise qualify to vote under law. Copyright ©2008 Pennsylvania Department of State. All rights reserved.

Check it Out At http://felonvoting.procon.org/